Australian researchers come up with a combination drug therapy for malaria in children

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Malaria in children is often treated by administration of Artemisinin, as they have a broad efficiency for multiple Plasmodium species. In Papua New Guinea, artemether-lumefantrine is the first-line of treatment for uncomplicated malaria, but its efficiency is limited against P. vivax.

The study reveals that artemisinin-naphthoquine combination therapy should have greater activity in vivax malaria. The reason for this is that naphthoquine is slower than lumefantrine to be eliminated. The authors compared artemether-lumefantrine treatment with artemisinin-naphthoquine treatment.

Using a randomized, controlled trial study design including 186 children with P. falciparum infections and 47 children with P. vivax infections, the researchers found that artemisinin-naphthoquine was non-inferior to artemether-lumefantrine for treating P. falciparum but was more effective for treating P. vivax.

The original publication can be accessed at: http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1001773

Disclaimer: This article does not reflect any personal views of the authors/editors

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Scientist-entrepreneur-manager-journalist: -Co-founder, Author; Former Assistant Editor and Director, Biotechin.Asia, Biotech Media Pte. Ltd.; -Founder & CEO, SciGlo (www.sciglo.com); -Programme Management Officer, SBIC, A*STAR (former Research Fellow). --Sandhya graduated from University of Madras, India (B.Sc Microbiology and M.Sc Biotechnology) and received her Ph.D from the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. She worked on oxidative stress in skin, skeletal, adipose tissue and cardiac muscle for a decade from 2006-2016. She is currently working as a Programme Management Officer handling projects and grants at Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (SBIC), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). Earlier to this she was a Research Fellow in the Fat Metabolism and Stem Cell Group at SBIC. Sandhya was also the Vice President and Publicity Chair of A*PECSS (A*STAR Post Doc Society) (2014-2016). Recently she founded a platform for scientists - SciGlo (www.sciglo.com) and is a startup mentor at Vertical VC (Finland). She is an ardent lover of science and enjoys globe trotting and good vegetarian food.

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