After all, size does matter!

0
925

The evolutionary theory that says birth-weight and birth-length can partially predict the occurrence of mental disorders later in life, especially during adolescence, has been proved to be correct by researchers from the Copenhagen Centre for Social Evolution and Yale University. The results have been published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society, London B. The study analyzed medical records of 5 million Danish births and their hospital diagnosis for up to 30 years. The study says that opposite risk patterns were observed for autism and schizophrenia which were associated with normal birth size variation. The study shows that above-average-sized babies had higher risk for autism and lower risk for schizophrenia, while the opposite was observed for below-average-sized babies. This study shows that your baby’s birth size does matter, after all!

Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/282705.php

Full details of the discovery can be accessed online at http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/281/1794/20140604.full

Previous articleCredentials faked-NUS relooks its academic recruitment process
Next articleSigns of recovery of the depleting Ozone layer
Scientist-entrepreneur-manager-journalist: -Co-founder, Author; Former Assistant Editor and Director, Biotechin.Asia, Biotech Media Pte. Ltd.; -Founder & CEO, SciGlo (www.sciglo.com); -Programme Management Officer, SBIC, A*STAR (former Research Fellow). --Sandhya graduated from University of Madras, India (B.Sc Microbiology and M.Sc Biotechnology) and received her Ph.D from the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. She worked on oxidative stress in skin, skeletal, adipose tissue and cardiac muscle for a decade from 2006-2016. She is currently working as a Programme Management Officer handling projects and grants at Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (SBIC), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR). Earlier to this she was a Research Fellow in the Fat Metabolism and Stem Cell Group at SBIC. Sandhya was also the Vice President and Publicity Chair of A*PECSS (A*STAR Post Doc Society) (2014-2016). Recently she founded a platform for scientists - SciGlo (www.sciglo.com) and is a startup mentor at Vertical VC (Finland). She is an ardent lover of science and enjoys globe trotting and good vegetarian food.